Cancer Overview

  • What is considered a cancer case?
    • A cancer surveillance case is any reportable cancer as defined by a set of uniform criteria used to define cancer for public health surveillance. If a person is diagnosed with breast cancer and colorectal cancer, each of these cancer diagnoses will be counted as a separate cancer case.
  • What are cancer incidence rates?
    • Cancer incidence rates are a standard way to report the new cancer cases occurring in a population.  They are typically reported as the number of new cancer cases per 100,000 people per year.
  • What are cancer mortality rates?
    • Cancer mortality rates are a standard way to report the number of deaths that are attributable to cancer.  Cancer mortality rates are typically reported as the number of deaths attributed to a certain cancer per 100,000 people per year.
  • How are the United States (U.S.) incidence rates estimated?
    • The U.S. incidence rates are estimates from the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) Program of the National Cancer Institute’s 18 regions.
  • Which morphology codes are included in each cancer site grouping?
    • The adult cancers (ages 20+) are grouped in accordance with the SEER Site Recode.

Types of Cancer

  • Why does the trend line for the U.S. begin with the year 2000?
    • The data that we use to estimate the incidence rates for the United States is the cancer incidence data from SEER’s 18 regions (which represents 25% of the U.S. population).  This database begins with diagnosis year 2000, because this was when several of the 18 regions joined the SEER program.

Cancer Stage

  • What is cancer stage?
    • Cancer stage is an assessment of the severity of a cancer at the time of diagnosis.
  • What does it mean when a cancer is discovered at an early stage?
    • If a cancer is discovered at an early stage, it means that the abnormal cells (in situ) or the cancer (localized) remain within the part of the body that it originated.
  • What does it mean when a cancer is discovered at a late stage?
    • If a cancer is discovered at a late stage, it means that the cancer has spread to the areas surrounding the point of origin (regional) or that the cancer has spread to other sites in the body, far from the original place that the cancer developed (distant).

Cancer Survival

  • What is 5-year relative survival?
    • A survival rate describes the percentage of people who are alive at a certain interval after being diagnosed with cancer. In this visualization, 5-year relative survival is presented, which illustrates the percent of people who are alive 5 years after their cancer diagnosis and takes into account deaths from other causes in that same population.

Pediatric Cancers

Notes

The Louisiana Tumor Registry is supported by the SEER Program (NCI), the National Program of Cancer Registries (CDC), the State of Louisiana, the LSU Health Sciences Center – New Orleans, and host institutions.

Do you have comments or questions about the data visualization?
Please email LTR-info@lsuhsc.edu. We look forward to hearing from our users!