Search Results for "Hui-Yi Lin"

Hui-Yi Lin

Curriculum Vitae: HLIN1.CV.PDF


Study Finds Flushing Water Lines Protects Inconsistently and May Increase Lead Exposure

Research conducted by LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health finds that the current recommendations for running water to flush out lead are not consistently effective and may not be the best way to protect children from lead in drinking water. The findings are published in the International Journal of Environmental Research and Public Health available online here.

“While flushing taps according to prevailing guidelines (for 30 seconds to 2 minutes) may reduce water lead levels for some homes, over half the tested homes had peak water lead levels after that time, so these recommendations may inadvertently increase exposures,” notes study leader Adrienne Katner, DEnv, Assistant Research Professor of Environmental & Occupational Health Sciences at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health. “More effective interventions like certified water filters should be considered instead, particularly when replacing water service lines and plumbing is not economically possible.”

The research team surveyed homeowners and tested water samples from 376 New Orleans homes on the East Bank of the Mississippi River (the city’s water source) between February 2015 and November 2016. Recruited homes met criteria for the potential presence of lead. Virginia Tech colleagues analyzed the water samples, which were first cold water draws, first hot water draws, draws after letting the water run for 30 – 45 seconds, 2.5 – 3 minutes or 5.5 – 6 minutes.

Overall, New Orleans water lead levels were typically low compared to the EPA’s action level of 15 ppb. The analysis revealed a water lead level of 5 ppb in 88% of all samples from normal-use residential sites. More than half of all samples from normal use sites (60%) had detectable water lead levels of at least 1 ppb or higher. Water lead levels ranged from non-detectable (less than 1 ppb) to 58 ppb found in samples after flushing for 30-45 seconds. There was no significant difference in water lead level distribution after flushing for the various amounts of time until the six-minute mark after which the water lead level distribution decreased.

“While the percent of samples with water lead levels exceeding 1 ppb did decrease after extended flushing for 5.5 to 6 min, the reductions were not always substantial,” says Dr. Katner. “If the aim is to prevent childhood lead exposure altogether, preferably, or at least reduce it to the minimally detectable level (1 ppb) as recommended by the American Academy of Pediatricians, then New Orleans may require more proactive interventions than flushing to meet this goal. We could not verify that a one-time flush is sufficient to maintain low water lead levels. Some studies evaluating flushing at school taps suggest frequent flushes may be needed throughout the day, as waterborne lead can return to pre-flush levels within hours. Prolonged and repeated flushing may also not be practical, cost-effective, or sustainable over the long term, especially in cities with declining water resources and/or rising water rates.”

Katner and her colleagues conclude, “Public health messages should be modified to ensure appropriate application of flushing, while acknowledging its short-comings and practical limitations.”

In addition to Katner, the LSU Health New Orleans research team included Drs. Hui-Yi Lin, Chih-Yang Hu, as well as Komal Brown and Xinnan Wang. Researchers from Virginia Tech, Tulane University, and Corona Environmental Consulting also participated.The research was supported in part by the Louisiana Board of Regents’ New Research Pilot Funding Program, the National Science Foundation, LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health and the National Institutes of Health.

Source


Spring 2019

Spring 2019

Speaker: Daniel Fort, PhD
Affiliation: Ochsner Health System, Center for Applied Health Services Research, New Orleans-LA
Title: Unsupervised Learning: Clustering
Date and Time: January 28, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303 

Speaker: Peter F Thall, PhD
Affiliation: Department of Biostatistics, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX
Title: Statistical Remedies for Flawed Conventions in Medical Research
Date and Time: February 11, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Chuck Huber, PhD
Affiliation: StataCorp and Texas A&M School of Public Health
Title: Casual Inference for Complex Observational Data
Date and Time: February 18, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Angela Stodghill, PhD
Affiliation: Janssen R & D (Johnson & Johnson), Raritan-NJ
Title: Responsibilities and Required Skills of Clinical Statisticians in Clinical Trials Processes
Date and Time: March 15, 2019, 10.00 am
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Michelle Lacey, PhD
Affiliation: Tulane University, Department of Mathematics, New Orleans-LA
Title: Modeling Methylation Patterns with Long Read Sequencing Data
Date and Time: March 18, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Hui-Yi Lin, PhD
Affiliation: LSUHSC, School of Public Health, Biostatistics Program, New Orleans-LA
Title: Impact of Interaction patterns on genetic association studies: an example of prostate cancer
Date and Time: April 1, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Christian Geneus, MS, MPH
Affiliation: Tulane School of Public Health and Tropical Medicine, Department of Global Biostatistics and Data Science, New Orleans-LA
Title: Quantifying Uncertainty in Model Predictions: Stages of the Network Modeling
Date and Time: April 8, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Tat Yau, MSc
Affiliation: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Biostatistics Program, New Orleans-LA
Title: Inference in Linear Multivariate Envelope Model
Date and Time: April 10, 2019, 2:00 pm
Room: MEB, Room S3 (3212)

Speaker: Yaling Li
Affiliation: Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center, Biostatistics Program, New Orleans-LA
Title: A Simulation Study to Check the Consequences of Violating Assumptions in Mediation Analysis
Date and Time: April 18, 2019, 8:30 am
Room: MEB, Room S7 (3224)

Speaker: Sungsu Kim, PhD
Affiliation: University of Louisiana at Lafayette, Department of Mathematics, Lafayette-LA
Title: A Multivariate Circular Distribution with Applications to the Protein Structure Prediction Problem
Date and Time: April 22, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Speaker: Huaizhen Qin, PhD
Affiliation: University of Florida, Department of Epidemiology, Gainesville-Florida
Title: Rare Variant Association Mapping in Admixed Populations
Date and Time: April 29, 2019, 3:00 pm
Room: LEC, Room 303

Organizer: Evrim Oral, PhD


LSU: Faculty and Researchers Used Emergency Department Data to Estimate Prevalence of Smoking in Young Adults

Faculty and researchers at the LSU School of Medicine (Drs. Stephen Kantrow and Sarah Jolley), Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center School of Public Health (Ms. Xinnan Wang, Dr. Tung-Sung Tseng, Dr. Dodie Arnold, Dr. Claudia Leonardi, Dr. Richard Scribner, Dr. Edward Trapido, Dr. Hui-Yi Lin), Ochsner Health System (Eboni Price Haywood) and the Louisiana Public Health Institute (Dr. Lisanne Brown) used emergency department (ED) data to estimate the prevalence of smoking in young adults. Most state or national surveys of smoking are limited in size- especially when looking at county level data, and phone based surveys have had decreasing responses. School based surveys are helpful, but limited by age.

The researchers used data from electronic health records (EHRs) for five EDs within U.S. Census-defined metropolitan New Orleans (New Orleans–Metairie, LA) for persons 18-24 years old. (15 percent of young adults are reported to have used EDs in the past year). Smoking status was available for 55,777 persons (91 percent of the total Emergency Departments); 61 percent were women, 55 percent were black, 35 percent were white, and 8 percent were Hispanic. One third of patients were uninsured. Most smokers used cigarettes (95 percent ). Prevalence of current smoking was 21.7 percent for women and 42.5 percent for men. Smoking prevalence was highest for substance use disorder (58 percent ), psychiatric illness (41 percent ) and alcohol use (39 percent ), and lowest for pregnancy (13.5 percent ). In multivariable analyses, male gender, white race, lack of health insurance, alcohol use, and illicit drug use were independently associated with smoking. Smoking risk among alcohol and drug users varied by gender, race, and/or age.

The BRFSS estimated 29 percent prevalence during the same time, and had data on 597 subjects aged 18–30 years. Although ED data are likely to overestimate tobacco use, the large sample size is useful- especially for stratum-specific estimates- particularly in a demographically diverse population. Dr. Stephen Kantrow, the lead investigator, stated ”this approach provides smoking data for a large sample of young adults in one metropolitan area, and may support longitudinal studies of smoking in high and low risk populations.

Full article


Better Statistical Methods to Understand Gene Interactions Leading to Cancer Development

BY LESLIE CAPO
(504) 568-4806; CELL (504) 452-9166

New Orleans, LA – Research led by Hui-Yi Lin, PhD, Associate Professor of Biostatistics at  LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health, has developed another novel statistical method for evaluating gene-to-gene interactions associated with cancer and other complex diseases. The Additive-Additive 9 Interaction (AA9int) method is described in a paper published in Bioinformatics, available online here.

“This method can identify combinations of genetic variants for predicting cancer risk and prognosis,” notes Dr. Lin, who is also the paper’s lead author.

AA9int is based upon another method Lin developed, SNP Interaction Pattern Identifier (SIPI), to identify interactions between single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). According to the National Institutes of Health, “Single nucleotide polymorphisms, frequently called SNPs (pronounced “snips”), are the most common type of genetic variation among people. Each SNP represents a difference in a single DNA building block, called a nucleotide.  Most commonly, these variations are found in the DNA between genes. They can act as biological markers, helping scientists locate genes that are associated with disease. When SNPs occur within a gene or in a regulatory region near a gene, they may play a more direct role in disease by affecting the gene’s function.”

Although SNP-SNP or gene-gene interaction studies have been emerging, the statistical methods for evaluating SNP-SNP interactions are still in their infancy. The conventional approach to test SNP interactions is to use a hierarchical interaction model with two main effects plus their interaction with both SNPs as an additive inheritance mode. However, this approach tests just one specific type of interaction, which can lead to many false negative findings.

SNP Interaction Pattern Identifier (SIPI), the first statistical method to thoroughly search for meaningful SNP-SNP interaction patterns in cancer and other complex diseases, can detect novel SNP interactions that the conventional statistical approach cannot. SIPI evaluates 45 SNP interaction patterns. Its computational demands are large, however, which may not be desirable for large-scale studies. So, Lin and her colleagues sought a smaller version with fewer testing models but with similar power. They showed that a mini version of SIPI – AA9int, which is composed of nine interaction models – used only about 20% of computing time. More efficient and feasible for large-scale studies, AA9int is still more effective than the traditional approach.

“We found that AA9int successfully detected 72-90% of the SIPI-identified SNP pairs,” reports Lin. “Not meant to replace SIPI, but for large-scale studies, AA9int is a powerful tool that can be used alone or as the screening stage of a two-stage approach (AA9int+SIPI) to detect SNP-SNP interactions.”

The research team also studied the impact of inheritance mode and model structure on detecting SNP-SNP interactions. SNP Interaction Pattern Identifier (SIPI) evaluates SNP interaction patterns by considering three major factors: model structure (hierarchical and non- hierarchical model), genetic inheritance mode (dominant, recessive and additive), and mode coding direction. AA9int considers non-hierarchical model structure and the additive mode. They found that non-hierarchical models play a more important role in SNP interaction detection than inheritance modes.

“These identified gene-gene or SNP-SNP interactions increase our understanding of the biological mechanisms of cancer development and may improve cancer diagnosis accuracy and reduce cancer-related deaths in the future.” Lin concludes.

The research team included scientists from the Prostate Cancer Association Group to Investigate Cancer Associated Alterations in the Genome (PRACTICAL) Consortium.

Computational facilities at LSU Health New Orleans School of Public Health were supported by high-performance computational resources provided by the Louisiana Optical Network Infrastructure (LONI).

The research was supported by a grant from the National Cancer Institute of the National Institutes of Health.

 


APHA Live! Available for On-Demand

Couldn’t make it to APHA 2017 in Atlanta?
You can still watch on-demand sessions and presentations that you missed – learn, be inspired APHA Live.
Contact mcuccia@lsuhsc.edu  for the LSU password to access the on-demand sessions of APHA for Faculty, Students and Staff.

13th Annual Public Health Finance Roundtable
Sunday, November 5th, 2017 Georgia World Congress Center – Room A405 3:00pm to 5:30pm
Click here for more information

APHA Film Festival: Screening of LSU Sponsored film “Michelle’s Story”
Session FF12: Global Public Health Film Festival: Inform, Educate, Empower, session 4 scheduled for Tuesday, November 7, 2017: 6:30 p.m.-8:00 p.m. 

Individual Presentations:

  • Oral Presentation
    “Expanding Patient Navigation Services in the Louisiana Breast and Cervical Health Program”
    Courtney S. Wheeler, MPH, Nannozi Ssenkoloto, MPH, Joann Lee, MPH, Donna Williams, DrPH
  • Poster Presentation
    “Drowned Out: The Smoke-Free East Baton Rouge Campaign and the Impact of a Thousand Year Flood”
    Authors: Aubree Thelen, MPH, Mikal Giancola, MPH, Lydia Kuykendal, MPH, Tonia Moore
  • Poster Presentation
    “Gender And Age Disparities In Relationship Of Acculturation, Sugar-sweetened Beverages Consumption And Obesity Among Latino Immigrants”
    Authors: Tung-Sung Tseng, DrPH, Shuang Yang, MS, Daesy K. Behrhorst, BA , Yu-Wen Chiu, DrPH, Chih-Yang Hu, MSPH, ScD , Hui-Yi Lin, PhD

Publications

SPOTLIGHT – July, 2020

2020 LSUHSC Virtual Summer Research Internship Poster Session

The Summer Research Internship Program has provided research opportunities for medical students, undergraduates, and high school students since 2003. Due to the current COVID-19 pandemic, summer 2020 research projects were performed mainly via a virtual learning model. The program directors, Dr. Paula Gregory and Dr. Fern Tsien, matched students with mentors from LSU Health Sciences Center, University Medical Center, and the Louisiana Cancer Research Center (LCRC). The Summer Research Internship Program has allowed students to cultivate their interest in pursuing careers in clinical sciences, public health, or basic sciences.

Funding support for the undergraduate virtual summer program was provided by:

  • LSUHSC School of Medicine, Office of the Dean
  • National Science Foundation (NSF) Research Experiences for Undergraduates (REU) Program 

2020 LSUHSC Virtual Summer Research Internship Poster Award (HERE)


SPOTLIGHT – June, 2019
Continuity of Outpatient Care and Avoidable Hospitalization: a Systematic Review

Yu-Hsiang Kao, Wei-Ting Lin, Wan-Hsuan Jenny Chen, Shiao-Chi Wu, and Tung-Sung Tseng.

Continuity of care (COC) is a core element of primary care, which has been associated with improved health outcomes. Hospitalizations for ambulatory care–sensitive conditions (ACSCs) are potentially preventable if these conditions are managed well in the primary care setting. This team of researchers, including Dr. Kao and Dr. Tung-Sung Tseng’s aim, was to conduct a systematic review of literature on the association between COC and hospitalizations for ACSCs. They used the Systematic literature review, a method which all published literature was searched for in PubMed and MEDLINE using PRISMA guidelines for collecting empirical studies. Studies published in English between 2008 and 2017 that measured the association between COC and at least one measure of ACSC hospitalizations were included in this review.

Their results, a total of 15 studies met the inclusion criteria and applied claims data to examine the association between COC and ACSC hospitalizations. Most studies (93.3%) demonstrated a statistically significant association of higher COC in the outpatient setting with reduced likelihood of hospitalization for either all ACSCs or a specific ACSC. A strong association was observed among studies focusing on patients with a specific ACSC. Additionally, most studies used the Bice-Boxerman COC index to measure COC and measured COC before a period of measuring ACSC hospitalizations. The team concluded that this systematic review identified an increased COC in outpatient care is associated with fewer hospitalizations for ACSCs. Increasing COC is favorable for patients who are managing a specific ACSC.

READ FULL ARTICLE HERE or go to https://www.ajmc.com/journals/issue/2019/2019-vol25-n4/continuity-of-outpatient-care-and-avoidable-hospitalization-a-systematic-review


Using the emergency department to investigate smoking in young adults

Faculty and researchers at the LSU School of Medicine (Stephen Kantrow and Sarah Jolley), LSU School of Public Health (Xinnan Wang, Tung-Sung Tseng, Dodie Arnold, Claudia Leonardi, Richard Scribner, Edward Trapido, Hui-Yi Lin), Ochsner Health System (Eboni Price Haywood) and the Louisiana Public Health Institute (Lisanne Brown) used emergency department (ED) data to estimate the prevalence of smoking in young adults. Most state or national surveys of smoking are limited in size- especially when looking at county level data, and phone based surveys have had decreasing responses. School based surveys are helpful, but limited by age. The researchers used data from EHRs for five EDs within U.S. Census-defined metropolitan New Orleans (New Orleans–Metairie, LA) for persons 18-24 years old. (15% of young adults are reported to have used EDs in the past year). Smoking status was available for 55,777 persons (91% of the total Emergency Departments); 61% were women, 55% were black, 35% were white, and 8% were Hispanic. One third of patients were uninsured. Most smokers used cigarettes (95%). Prevalence of current smoking was 21.7% for women and 42.5% for men. Smoking prevalence was highest for substance use disorder (58%), psychiatric illness (41%) and alcohol use (39%), and lowest for pregnancy (13.5%). In multivariable analyses, male gender, white race, lack of health insurance, alcohol use, and illicit drug use were independently associated with smoking. Smoking risk among alcohol and drug users varied by gender, race, and/or age.

The BRFSS estimated 29% prevalence during the same time, and had data on 597 subjects aged 18–30 years. Although ED data are likely to overestimate tobacco use, the large sample size is useful- especially for stratum-specific estimates- particularly in a demographically diverse population. Dr. Stephen Kantrow, the lead investigator, stated ”this approach provides smoking data for a large sample of young adults in one metropolitan area, and may support longitudinal studies of smoking in high and low risk populations.

READ MORE


Descriptive Study of 30-day Hospital Readmissions for Person 65 and Older in Louisiana 2011-2014

Since 2012 greater scrutiny is being given to factors associated with patients readmitted to a hospital within 30 days of a discharge from the same hospital. Interest in these readmissions is driven by higher health costs as well as healthcare outcomes. Utlizing patient admission records from the Lousiana Hospital Inpatient Discharge Database (LAHIDD) for fiscal years 2011 to 2014, an interdisciplinary team at LSU Health Sciences Center in New Orleans investigated the relationships between patient race, gender, discharge status and comorbidities and 30-day readmissions among Louisianans 65 years and older.

The research team, School of Public Health associate professor Susanne Straif-Bourgeois, assistant professor Elizabeth Levitzky and MPH student Asha Buehler and Center for Interprofessional Education and Collaborative Practice director Tina Gunaldo, analyzed over 300,000 patient admissions during the 4-year period. The team evaluated the total number of admissions as well as the number of 30-days readmissions for each patient, focusing on five diagnosis categories – circulatory, digestive, infectious, respiratory diseases and unintentional injuries.

The researchers found differences in readmission rates among patients 65 years and older grouped by race, gender, and discharge location prior to readmission. Within these older patients, the rate of readmission varied by diagnosis code category with circulatory diseases having the highest rate among the five diagnosis categories of interest. White males showed the highest rates in each category. The discharge location prior to the 30-day readmission also differed among the race and gender groups.  Full article here


Supporting health system transformation through an interprofessional education experience focused on population health

Kari F. Brisolara, Sonia Gasparini, Alison H. Davis, Shane Sanne, Sandra Carlin Andrieu, Jerald James, Donald E. Mercante, Raquel Baroni De Carvalho & Tina Patel Gunaldo

The purpose of this study according to Dr. Kari Brisolara, of the LSUHSC School of Public Health, was to determine the impact of an interprofessional education (IPE) experience on first year students across all schools of a health sciences center on the topic of pediatric immunizations. The research team conducted a pre-/post-test at Louisiana State University Health Sciences Center-New Orleans with 731 first year students from 25 academic programs encompassing all six schools (Allied Health, Dentistry, Graduate Studies, Medicine, Nursing and Public Health). In the four questions related to the Interprofessional Education Collaborative (IPEC) sub-competencies and the three questions related to professional role regarding immunizations, there was a statistically significant difference in the pre-/post-test survey results (< 0.0001). Student learning related to the collaboration needed to make a larger impact on patient outcomes was demonstrated through assessment of an open-ended question. IPE experiences can improve first-year students’ perceptions of IPEC sub-competencies regarding the importance of population health and teamwork. By utilizing a population health focus with IPE activities, novice learners are equipped to learn and apply collaborative practice skills along with recognizing the importance of promoting overall health and well-being instead of just health care.

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A Partnership in Health-Related Social Media for Young Breast Cancer Survivors

Donna L. Williams, DrPH, Timiya S. Nolan, PhD, Yu-wen Chiu, DrPH, MPH, Laura Ricks, MPH, Silvia Gisiger Camata,MPH, Barbara Craft, MD, Karen Meneses, PhD

In the United States, about 11% (26,393) of those diagnosed with breast cancer in 2016 will be young or less than 45 years old. Young breast cancer survivors, compared to older cancer survivors, are a disparate group that experience higher incidence of advanced disease, greater mortality, and poorer quality of life, and are often faced with difficulty locating support that meets the unique needs of young women. The Gulf States Young Breast Cancer Survivor Network, composed of three sister networks, formed a partnership aimed at harnessing the power of social media to reach and impact the lives of young women with breast cancer. The collaborative partnership framework and the power of synergy are shown in merging two existing programs and incorporating a third new program.

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A Platform for Monitoring Fiscal Health and Sustainability of the Public Health System

According to a new study titled, “The Public Health Uniform National Data System (PHUND$): A Platform for Monitoring Fiscal Health and Sustainability of the Public Health System,” published in the Journal of Public Health Management and Practice on August 13, 2018, it states, “Leaders of government agencies are responsible for stewardship over taxpayer investments. Stewardship […]

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Subgroup-specific dose finding in phase I clinical trials based on time to toxicity allowing adaptive subgroup combination ~ Andrew G. Chapple and Peter F. Thall

A Bayesian design is presented that does precision dose finding based on time to toxicity in a phase I clinical trial with two or more patient subgroups. The design, called Sub-TITE, makes sequentially adaptive subgroup-specific decisions while possibly combining subgroups that have similar estimated dose-toxicity curves. Decisions are based […]

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Analyzing over diagnosis risk in cancer screening: A case of screening mammography for breast cancer ~ Mahboubeh Madadi, Mohammadhossein Heydari, Shengfan Zhang, Edward Pohl, Chase Rainwater & Donna L. Williams

Overdiagnosis is defined as the diagnosis of an asymptotic cancer that would not have presented clinically in a patient’s lifetime in the absence of screening. Quantifying overdiagnosis is difficult, since it is impossible to distinguish between a cancer that would cause symptoms in the patient lifetime and the ones that would not. In this study, a mathematical framework is developed to estimate the lifetime overdiagnosis and cancer mortality risks associated with cancer screening policies […]

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 LATEST RESEARCH NEWS – Fall 2018